About Us

Richardson Heights has been a leader in Richardson neighborhood advocacy

Richardson Heights Neighborhood Association began when Richardson Heights Baptist Church, formerly located at the corner of Beltline and Floyd, intended to buy and demolish dozens of homes in order to expand its parking lot. RHNA formed to fight back against this plan and was ultimately successful. The church moved to US-75 and Renner and the RISD purchased the former church property.
 
Heights residents formed Richardson’s Crime Watch Patrol when crime was peaking nationwide in the early 1990s and property break-ins were common over the Metroplex. Their mission was to be visible, observe, and report. The Richardson Police initially opposed citizens patrolling their own neighborhoods, but eventually the department equipped the neighborhood with walkie-talkies and car signs. Neighborhood break-ins dropped over 70% and now Neighborhood Crime Watch is a city-wide program.
 
Richardson Heights was one of the first neighborhoods with neighborhood entry signs. Richardson partnered with the City of Richardson to create these permanent fixtures and signage that is now common all over Richardson.
 
Richardson Heights, with Cottonwood Heights and Heights Park, initiated a neighborhood revitalization program called the 2009 Heights Plan for Excellence. This five-point plan was endorsed by the Richardson City Council and resulted in a number of policies which were part of the revitalization of the Heights Neighborhoods in SW Richardson.
 
Durham Park was one result of revitalization, which focused attention on parks for underserved areas. Funded in the 2010 Bond Program, Durham Park demonstrated another “first” in neighborhood involvement. Richardson Heights, with the City, Cottonwood Heights and park designer StudioOutside, was awarded an Honorable Mention from the Greater Dallas Planning Council in the 2016 Urban Design Awards.
 
When DFW’s first Alamo Drafthouse proposed coming to Heights Shopping Center, real estate professionals contacted the RHNA and the neighborhood brought out what it believes is the largest crowd in favor of a zoning case in Richardson history.
 
And our advocacy continues in support of our neighborhood!